Paul Klee: Making Visible opens at the Tate Modern

038Paul Klee – Making Visible at the Tate Modern

An exhibition of over 130 colourful drawings, watercolours and paintings created by Paul Klee has opened at the Tate Modern.
This is the first time that a museum has shown Klee in the way he wanted the public to see his works and records the period of the Bauhaus era.
In 1921, he was invited to the Bauhaus in Weimar, Germany and joined the radical art school, later moving with them to Dessau. Although Swiss born, he became one of the key figures of art in Germany in the 1920s.
Ships in the DarkKlee wrote ‘Art does not reproduce the visible rather it makes visible’. “We reveal the reality that is behind visible things”, he said, “thus expressing the belief that the visible world is merely an isolated case in relation to the universe and that there are many more other latent realities.”
Bauhaus held its first exhibition in Weimar in the summer of 1923. According to Klee, his personal mastery of colour stemmed from a trip to Tunisia in April 1914, and for many years he drew inspiration from its atmosphere and the compositions conceived there. Throughout his life, Klee continued to invert new practices of draughtsmanship and painting methods. Technical experiments were always an important element of his practice. For anyone interested in the Bauhaus movement, and works relating to European Modernism this is an exhibition not to be missed.
Get the most out of the exhibition by attending the private view and127rt curator’s talk on Tuesday 29 October or Monday 18 November at 6.30pm £20.00. The exhibition runs until 9 March, 2014. Admission £15.
Open daily from 10am to 6pm and until 10pm on Friday and Saturday.
T. 020 7887 8888 www.tate.org.uk

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About natashablair1

Travel journalist who enjoys discovering new places in style, where possible, with her dog, a Coton de Tulear, called Poppy. Good food, not necessarily gourmet, is important as is the atmosphere as she also writes about restaurants. Culture is another love, and as she is based in London, she reviews theatre and art exhibitions.
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