Daumier: Visions of Paris opens at the Royal Academy

The Sideshow (Parade de Saltimbanques), c. 1865-66 Daumier: Visions of Paris Exhibition opens at the Royal Academy.

Honoré Daumier is known for his uncompromising political and social caricatures of nineteenth century France. The exhibition in the Sackler Wing of the Royal Academy brings together 130 works, many never seen in the UK, of his paintings, watercolours, drawings, lithographs and sculptures.

Lithograph on woven paper 21.2 x 24.2 cm    Private collection Photo Peter McClennan

Lithograph on woven paper 21.2 x 24.2 cm Private collection Photo Peter McClennan

His work is indicative of the perils of his time (1808 – 1879). A staunch believer in the French Republic, he showed special empathy to working-class Parisians, while also portraying the habits of the bourgeoisie. He made memorable pictures of ordinary moments. Lithographs, particularly in the last room, portray his great sensitivity in the handling of his paintings.
In his lifetime, he drew over 4,000 lithographs and 1,000 designs for wood engravings that were published in La Caricature and Le Chavivari. While satirical lithographs made his name, lesser-known works reveal his ambitious range of subject matter from Cervantes’s Don Quixote to


the colourful cavalcade of Parisian street society. With no formal training, Daumier pursued an individual artistic path inspired by work that he saw at the Louvre in Paris.
Forty five minute introductory talks, free with an exhibition ticket, take place on Tuesdays at 2.30pm and Fridays at 7pm. The exhibition opens on 26 October and runs until 26 January 2014.
While visiting, allow enough time to also see the Royal Academy’s exhibition Australia in the main galleries which is on until 8 December, 2013.
10am – 6pm daily Fridays to 10pm. £10.00 children under 12 go free
http://www.Royalacademy.org.uk T. 020 7300 8000

Advertisements

About Natasha Blair

Travel journalist who enjoys discovering new places in style, where possible, with her dog, a Coton de Tulear, called Poppy. Good food, not necessarily gourmet, is important as is the atmosphere as she also writes about restaurants. Culture is another love, and as she is based in London, she reviews theatre and art exhibitions.
This entry was posted in Culture and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s