Painting with Light opens at London’s Tate Britain

 

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Dante Gabriel Rossetti Proserpine 1874

Painting with Light: Art and Photography from the Pre-Raphaelites to the Modern Age opens at the Linbury Galleries, Tate Britain.

The invention of photography in 1839 contributed to a period of change for the visual arts in Britain. The development of new materials and techniques influenced painters and photographers who shared ambitions and ideas. Spanning over 70 years, the exhibition brings together nearly 200 works to reveal their mutual influences.

The dawn of photography coincided with the a tide of revolutionary ideas in the arts which questioned how pictures should be created and seen.

As the quality of paints and lenses improved, painters and photographers tested the bounds of perception and representation. Photography adapted the Old Master traditions within which many photographers had been trained, and engaged with radical naturalism. As the nineteenth century progressed, some artists moved away from the clarity and detail that had been the aim of pre-Raphaelite art. The first colour photographic process in 1907 saw the introduction of auto-chrome.

Within the exhibition the role of women photographers is also celebrated. Highlights of the show include examples of three-dimensional photography which incorporated the use of models and props, and a rarely seen Royal family photograph album.

Related events include the Curator’s Tour Friday 20 May and Curator’s Talk Friday 10 June – £20.00 a session.  The exhibition closes on 25 September, 2016.

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William Holman Hunt Wood engraving on paper The Lady of Shallot illustration published 1857

Open daily 10.00 – 18.00   T. 020 7887 8888               www.tate.org.uk

 

 

 

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About Natasha Blair

Travel journalist who enjoys discovering new places in style, where possible, with her dog, a Coton de Tulear, called Poppy. Good food, not necessarily gourmet, is important as is the atmosphere as she also writes about restaurants. Culture is another love, and as she is based in London, she reviews theatre and art exhibitions.
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